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Sunday, 17 March 2013

The monster under the bed – How to cope up with negative thinking



We suffer more in imagination than in reality.”
- Seneca

Thoughts keep going in our head all the time. The problem occurs when we impose our identity with them.

Identity is what you are, or rather what you think you are. When you impose a thought on your identity and if that thought is negative, your identity suffers, and when the identity suffers, you suffer.

Wait a minute, let me rewind.

You are not your job.
You're not how much money you have in the bank.
You're not the car you drive.
You're not the contents of your wallet.
- Tyler Durden – Fight CLub

Ever seen kids being afraid of the dark, they imagine these boogie monsters everywhere and get seriously scared about things.
But when things grow, they learn that there are no monsters under the bed. So the think of new things to be afraid of.

Afraid of going out. Afraid of failing. Afraid of making a move.

We all imagine our identities as a seemingly ideal persona. We are respectable, honourable creatures and hence wont do anything which makes us look like a failure. That is our identity. That has become our identity.

And when we vividly imagine our failures, we imagine and foresee damage to our identity. And that stops people from doing the things they wanted to do.

I just felt like saying this much.

You start taking pushups and you have a goal of 15 reps. The moment you do the ninth pushup, you feel these thoughts that keep running around in the head, saying you can't do all the way to fifteen, as your hands tremble as you take the tenth count.

There is no particular cure as such to stop this kind of negative thoughts that keep popping around in our head. They are thoughts, they will come.

The sweat in your forehead, drips down on the ground, as you take the eleventh pushup, making the situation worse and dramatic.

Distrusting these thoughts like is the only methodology to bypass them. It takes experience to learn to identify which thoughts to be trusted and which to be not.

And take the count to 15.  

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